Wild Horse Information
Hors-Sens


Solid Information Needed to Manage

Free-Roaming Horses & Burros

 

From the Wild Free-Roaming Horse and Burro Act of 1971, “Congress finds and declares that wild free-roaming horses and burros are living symbols of the historic and pioneer spirit of the West; that they contribute to the diversity of life forms within the Nation and enrich the lives of the American people; and that these horses and burros are fast disappearing from the American scene. It is the policy of Congress that wild free-roaming horses and burros shall be protected from capture, branding, harassment, or death; and to accomplish this, they are to be considered in the area where presently found, as an integral part of the natural system of the public lands.”

Congress took responsibility for the management of free-roaming horses and burros when they passed the Wild Horse and Burro Act of 1971 and took it away from those who had been getting the job done.  In 1971 the free-roaming horses and burros needed a management plan, not protected.  Congress and the Act of 1971 made it impossible to properly manage the free-roaming horses and burros on our public lands.  It is important to manage them to keep their population from doubling every four years if.  Mother nature will take care of horse and burro populations when they reach levels the range will not support.  There is nothing kind or gentle when nature reduces their populations!  Horses, burros and other animals they share the range with will suffer lingering deaths caused by starvation, lack of water and illnesses caused by stress.   Many will suffer painful lingering deaths and the entire ecosystem will suffer.

By 1976 the wild horse and burro populations on the public lands of the West had doubled prompting Congress to change the Act of 1971 to allow helicopter gathers and use motorized vehicles for transportation.  With helicopters, The Wild Horse and Burro Program was able to slow population growth.  Between 1976 and 2001 the wild horse and burro populations ranged from 42,000 to 60,000 head.  In 2007 the Wild Horse and Burro Program almost reached the Appropriate Management Level (AML) of approximately 27,000 head of wild free-roaming horses and burros on the public lands.  It took over 36 years to almost reach AML.  But to do that, 30,000 head of horses and burros were warehoused in off the range in feedlots and on pastures.  The number of animals in the Wild Horse and Burro Program had not been reduced.

In the spring of 2019, there was 88,000 head of horses and burros on the range (three times AML) and another 50,000 off the range.  After almost 50 years, it is time to change or eliminate the Wild Horse and Burro Act of 1971!  The Act has failed and was based on misinformation and Myths.  It needs to be replaced with a management plan based on solid information. 

What the public, Congress and wild horse advocates know about free-roaming horses is mainly emotionally charged misinformation and myths that make it impossible to develop a realistic management plan for free-roaming horses and burros.  No matter what it is called, horse sense, reason and logic or critical thinking, all need solid information to make good judgments and reach good decisions!

For healthy horses and burros on healthy ranges, they need to be well managed.  If the wild horse advocates do not allow the free-roaming horses and burros to be properly managed, they need to be removed from the range.  There are only two options, properly manage the free-roaming horses and burros or remove them.  It is that simple.

This website is a source of solid information needed to pull together a realistic management plan supported by critical thinking.



Copyright © 2016-2019 Gerald Miller. All Rights Reserved.

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